Another Fun Week With ATG


It’s been another ‘fun’ week at ATG.

Talal visited last week, and while he seemed to be at a bit of a loss as to what to do, looking like a lost schoolboy, his presence still caused its own fair share of chaos. After three weeks of atrocious Wi-Fi in the office, Talal instructed the runners to go and buy a 4G mobile internet modem. Our pleasant surprise was short lived. After half an hour of actual proper Internet access, we suddenly lost access when Talal had the password changed (unannounced) so only he could use it. But on the plus side, we got paid on time, no doubt the result of Talal not wanting to sit with a group of people pissed off at not being paid wages. This also meant that Andrew’s reply (sent while Talal was with us) to Ibrahim’s email encouraging us to accept monthly wages was met with an extremely brief, inarticulate, and equally ambiguous reply from Talal.

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Somehow, I doubt Talal’s email will be the end of the matter. And indeed, Terry’s email to Jude this afternoon, reminding her that our wages are supposed to be paid today, was met with an unsurprising silence.

On Thursday evening, I was dragged out on a recce to the hangar with Talal, Majid, Issam and Ahmed. When it became apparent that using the actual hangar as an office was a ridiculous idea, Talal proposed that we go to Katara village (where Ahmed has an office), and that we aim to get some office space there. For a moment, as we were sitting with the manager of the entire Katara Village facility and a rather lengthy conversation took place in Aramaic, I actually thought Talal was asking to rent an office. But as we left, I discovered that Talal had in fact been trying to blag an office for free on this $50 million production!!! As a result, we were offered the use of the unused canteen — an area that included a corridor through which people traipsed on a constant basis.

Talal then took us for dinner. Conversation fluctuated between animated Aramaic conversation and awkward silence. When it came time to pay the bill, the waiter handed it to Talal who promptly shoved it towards Majid so that he could pay out of the show’s budget. The food was good though, and we eventually left.

The other bizarre thing that happened was that after a few days of listening to Issam and Ahmed talk naively about hiring production designers like Gavin Bouquet (Star Wars) and Stuart Craig (multi-Academy award-winning designer whose credits include Harry Potter movies), Talal decided that we did not need a designer since Chris had already designed the show.

Well, never mind the fact that only about 5% had been designed and none of it locked! It cannot be overstated what a moronic thing this is to say.

Aside from the fact that not all of the sets have been designed, a designer is needed to see the designs through to completion of their construction. And let’s not get onto supervising design during the shoot! I can only assume that they do not want a designer because that way the art department has no real authority. And given that we have been such a nuisance with our constant requests to buy props, dressing and materials and crew to build sets and so on, (you know, the kind of stuff that a show usually has), well, who can blame them? 

Today there was a new development. This morning Bob emailed me to tell me that he had sent an email to ATG informing them that he had contacted a barrister who has told him that ATG has repeatedly been in breach of contract due to its failure to pay his wages on time, its failure to pay his last few weeks wages, and also that they had doctored his contract and gotten him to sign it under duress, and because of this if they do not pay him the rest of the money that he is owed by the end of this Wednesday the copyright of all his work will revert to him. They’re so stupid they may not pay.

Today, when I proposed to ATG that we hire the construction manager I had found if we were not getting a designer yet, it was suggested to me that maybe I could be the production designer, the art director and the construction manager! It would be funny if it weren’t so ridiculous. Needless to say, my answer was brief and it was a very short conversation….

The last thing to happen today, Ahmed emailed me saying that he would like to talk about how some of the old designs were no good. He asked me if he should give me his notes on the set or give them to the new designer once one had been appointed. Clearly, he does not know that they do not intend appointing one.

Or were they lying to me (I actually found out through Bob as they did not even bother to tell me), when they said they were not going to get one? And if so, why…?

FOOTNOTE APRIL 21st, 2017

Since I never signed a contract with Arab Telemedia AND I’m owed money, the hi-lighted text above (bold and italics) would mean that all work done by me on Medinah remains my property. As such, ANY attempt by the show’s owner’s to sell or broadcast it shall be illegal and subject to a potential major lawsuit by me.

The Aftermath …


A few things have happened this week. All interlinked. Some good. Sort of.

We received an email. Here it is;

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By sending this, ATG have unwittingly made life difficult for themselves. To understand why, see our response;

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In a nutshell, ATG really did not think this through. It doesn’t surprise me. As manipulative as they are, they aren’t very smart. They clearly did not realise the real meaning of what they were writing. But there was another element to the email that made ATG’s position even weaker.

SIMON NEVER AGREED TO MONTHLY PAYMENTS AND HE WAS OUTRAGED.

To explain, Simon got a call from Ibrahim the night the email was to be sent. Ibrahim told Simon about the above email and asked Simon to say that he had agreed to monthly payments so it could go in the email. Simon said absolutely not. Ibrahim said something like, “Come on Simon. Help us out here.” Simon refused. Ibrahim push the matter but Simon continued to refuse. Ibrahim then said it was too late, the email had already been sent, and laughed! Simon was furious.

So Simon then sent out an email of his own.

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After which, he started getting calls from Talal and Ibrahim giving him an earful about how it was not their fault (!), and he was just being difficult!!!

This, of course, undermined their entire email.

But this email had another unexpected benefit — it was written by Issam, a fact we all knew because Ibrahim can barely string a sentence together in English and the writing was too masculine to have been written by Jude, so when we sat down with Issam and started to ‘joke’ about who it must have been written by, as much as Issam denied it, will all knew it was true. In fact, he looked very down.

Afterwards, I learnt from a third party just how much Issam is in trouble. He is owed over $40,000 by ATG. Further, in order to live in Qatar (which he does because his wife has a job here), he required a sponsor and that sponsor is Ahmed, the series creator. As Issam’s sponsor, Ahmed can prevent Issam from leaving the country. And since Ahmed and ATG are at loggerheads, Issam is caught in an impossible position.

I now realise Issam does what he does because he has no choice. He does exactly what ATG tells him because he knows they will not pay him if he does not. Essentially, they are blackmailing him. Meantime, he has to somehow appease his sponsor, Ahmed. His situation is impossible. It reflects poorly on Ahmed that, as Issam’s sponsor, Issam should never have been out in this position in the first place. Issam is the Line Producer. He is supposed to look after the investors’ interests. But he cannot because he is paid by the production company, ATG. It is a massive conflict of interest and the Qatari’s were beyond naive to have pout Issam in this position.

On an aside, Talal arrived yesterday. Apparently, his trip was planned before Chris quit. Although he was giving Simon an earful the night before about not agreeing to lie and say he approved monthly payments, he arrived looking like a pussycat. He said nothing about ATG’s email. He spent the day sitting with us, joking, suggesting to Ahmed that we move all interior locations and sets to Pinewood (which Ahmed flatly refused), and he bought a 4G router. We all thought the router was for us because we had said the internet here was lousy. But one hour later, none of us could use it. Talal had changed the password so only he could use it! In his defence, it had stopped working because too may of us were using it, but he could have said that and maybe allowed some of us to use it. But no. He’s a bit of a coward that way.

Oh, and about the 15 1515 numberplate on his brand new Range Rover. He claimed he had never noticed what it said, and that he has had it for 16 years. I suggested he at least change it to 151515 or he might get pulled over by the police. He seemed amused, “Is ISIS? … Cool….”

FOOTNOTE ADDED APRIL 19th, 2017.

Someone recently alleged to me that the whole production of “Medinah” is a front to finance ISIS. That the money goes from a Sheikh in Qatar to an off-shore account where ATG takes a cut and the rest is funnelled by ATG onto ISIS. This is a truly scary thought. I’ve been advised not to repeat this, but it needs to be said. If that is what was/is happening (personally, I doubt it), it needs investigating. ATG really needs to be put under the microscope.

The Truth Is Out……


So I’ve been promising a major bit of news and here it is.

After it all went off over the wages, Issam, Chris and Simon decided we should all have a meeting to discuss the email that we had sent (see below).

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As you will see, the email was to the point, factual, and decisive. It was written by more than one person, sent from an anonymous account so ATG could not victimise anyone, and signed alphabetically so they could not pinpoint a hierarchy.

The next day, ATG had a crisis meeting and on the Sunday they responded with this email;

Praxino Mail – Unpaid Wages

(click link above to see full email)

Praxino Mail - Unpaid Wages copy

It runs for several pages (4) and is remarkable in that it manages to turn our “to the point, factual, and decisive” email into something else. ATG clearly put a lot of work into this email. They must have, because there are so many lies. Not one thing in it is true. But let’s start with the rather bizarre insinuation that our email represents a conspiracy! Why did they do this?

The answer to this question is best represented by how Abdul began the meeting. He started by labouring the fact that ATG was concerned about the email because it suggested a conspiracy intended to sabotage the show (!) and that if we had problems he would rather we approach him one-on-one. Why did he say this? Because ATG like to bully and while they can bully individuals, they cannot bully a group. So Abdul’s statement had nothing to do with fixing problems and everything to do with “fixing us”.

But all of this is nothing compared to what happened half an hour into the meeting.

I think it was me who initially pushed the point about the fact that Abdul was compromised because ATG owes him US$40,000+. I pointed out that he was supposed to look after the investors’ interests but how could he when ATG owed him so much money? He asked me what it had to do with me and why did I care? I said I cared about people doing what was right and ATG were not doing what was right by him. It was then that things started to unravel.

Abdul explained that he did not mind being owed so much money because he could afford to take “a hit”. For example, he said, “If four payments are owed, two to me and two to Ray, I’m happy for him to be paid.” At which point Chris said, “Well that obviously means there is a cash flow problem.” Abdul then said that was not the case, at which point we started going round in circles as Chris, myself (and I think Terry) started to question his logic;

“If there isn’t a cash flow problem, why aren’t they paying you?”
“Well, because they can’t right now.”
“So there is a cash flow problem?”
“No, there isn’t.”
“So why aren’t they paying you? If they have the cash, what is stopping them?”
“Well they have had a problem making payments.”
“For four months! They’re paying us. How come they can’t pay you?”
“Because they can’t.”
“Then there is a cash flow problem?”

Or words to the above affect. At which point a studio representative, who had been quietly listening said, “I don’t understand, Where is all the money we just gave you?”

We could all see that Abdul knew he was in trouble. He tried to make excuses, then the studio rep dropped the final blow.

“This makes me think ATG must be spending Medinah’s money on it’s other shows.”

Terry and I both saw a look of utter horror flicker across Abdul’s face. He quickly made excuses. But at that point everyone around the table knew – the studio rep had just said he knew what ATG was up to. It was out there. And Abdul was cornered.

But it was at that point we backed off.

We all know Abdul is cornered. ATG owes him $40,000-plus and they are using it to control him. He is their puppet, and they can make him dance as much as they like.

While we have no actual proof that ATG is embezzling money and everything I say in this blog is alleged only, Abdul signs contracts and agreements and payments. If ATG is up to no good, and we all firmly believe that is the case, he is directly in the firing line. It’s no accident ATG sent Abdul and Majid to Doha alone. Majid has no authority and Abdul is expendable. Chris and I have discussed the fact that if ATG do get caught, we believe Talal and Fadi would go to jail. The same could be true of Abdul.

For anyone who would like to deny the above conversation ever took place, well, I recorded it.

Chris Quits – Part 2


Today wasn’t off to the brightest start. Chris had told ATP he was quitting and heading back to London on Friday (tomorrow). Dominic Smithers had booked his flight for this evening. Terry was determined to go and he told Ray to start phoning around for new jobs.

I’d also heard that ATP were combing through Chris’s contract trying to find loopholes to force him to stay. I was a bit baffled by that as it was my understanding Chris never signed (see earlier blog entry on this). I guess I’ll find more out about this later.

But shortly after breakfast, Terry gave me an update. Andrew McEwan and Simon had told Ray and Terry that Talal had called Chris and was of the impression that Chris would be back in two weeks. This, despite Chris having sent him an email last night saying he had quit.

Then Chris went to tell Ahmed the news. Ahmed didn’t yet know any of this. An hour later Andrew saw him out on the street shouting into his phone. Then not long after this I bumped into Simon and Dominic in the hallway. Simon asked me my plans. I said I was staying for now to see what happens. I asked him his plans. He said he was “terrified” after what he’d just heard was happening to Chris.

He then wandered off and Dominic told me that Simon had just told him to be ready to go to the airport at a moment’s notice. That seemed very dramatic, I thought, and I asked why. Dom said that ATP (and he thinks Ahmed) had just come down on Chris like a ton of bricks. I asked how that was possible. Dom added that he did not know but that Simon had told him that ATP might demand to have our passports to stop us leaving.

He then told me that Ahmed had been stunned by Chris’s statement. Apparently, he had not seen it coming. We both marvelled at how naive Ahmed can be. I want to say this in Ahmed’s defence. He is 26 and out of his depth. He needs good people around him on this job, looking after his interests, but all he has is ATP.

As Dom told me this, Issam came wandering up – all casual – and said to Smithers, “Here is what I can do for you. I can offer you work back in Jordan on Malik.” At that point, I wandered off. We all know what a farce Malik is. And this for a company that has no morality at all. How could Dom possibly say, “Yes”?

Clearly, it is really going to kick off big time over the next few days. We are supposed to be paid on Sunday. That may be in jeopardy as ATP attempt to force control over us with whatever they have.

On an unrelated footnote, I heard yesterday that a few years ago when this was all starting up, the Qatari investors paid ATP US$3 million to do a feasibility study into shooting “Medinah” in Qatar. Such a study would normally cost about $80,000. So where did the rest of the money go?

Oh, one last thing; I have heard several times now that ATP thought they did not have to provide audited accounts because it was private money. But it is not private money; it is the Qatari governments money and, as a consequence of ATP’s failure to deliver, they have been ordered to provide audited accounts. The problem ATP has is that they have received over $10 million and there is no way they have spent more than $3 million on the show. At a meeting earlier this week which I shall talk about tomorrow, Ahmed was finally compelled to say to Abdul, “Where is all the money?” What happened I’ll explain tomorrow.

Arrested Development


It’s been a month since I made an entry in this blog. The truth is that it is exhausting enough having to deal with this company never mind having to have to write about it afterwards.

Currently we are in Doha, Qatar. We arrived on Saturday and already the rot has begun to set in.

Yesterday, I had a meeting with Ahmed – the series creator – in which I asked him what it was he was hoping to get now we were here. Meantime, I was told today by Ray Perry, who had spoken to Terry, that Ibrahim had been heard saying that filming of the series was never going to happen in Doha. This did not bode well.

Several weeks earlier, I have been told by Abdul that Talal had told him that the series would never be shot in Doha. Apparently, Talal told Abdul that ATG would “go through the motions” (or words to that affect) and act like it really intended to shoot the series in Doha, but when the Qatari people found out how much it was going to cost to film in Doha they would panic and the shoot would revert back to Jordan. That might explain why ATG has been working feverishly on a first season budget which, I have heard, will top $125 million.

This seems to fall in line with Arab Telemedia’s Production Crew’s behaviour here in Qatar. So far they’ve bought over the absolute barest minimum of Arab Telemedia crew. They have taken all of the good people we had, kept them in Jordan, and attempted to stick them on other projects being produced by Arab Telemedia. Meantime, nothing is really happening here apart from meetings.

Take for example Abdul. Currently he is stuck at Arab Telemedia 1 in Jordan where he is being hassled to work on other projects. This is despite the fact that Chris and I have repeatedly told Arab Telemedia’s producers that we need him with us. But Arab Telemedia simply doesn’t care what we think.

The story of Abdul’s failure to end up working here in Qatar is highly representative of the unethical and insidious work practices of Arab Telemedia. When we first said that we needed Abdul to come with us, he was repeatedly offered work as a full-time employee at Arab Telemedia. However, he kept turning the offers down. When it became clear to Arab Telemedia that he was not going to agree to become a full-time employee, Arab Telemedia went cold on the idea of allowing us to bring him to Qatar.

The question is why?

My own personal suspicion, and this has been mentioned by several other people, is that Arab Telemedia would have been happy for him to come here if he was an employee of the company because they could pay him a pittance while charging the investors considerably more. However, since Abdul refused to be an employee they were not able to use him as a ‘cash cow’. As a consequence, they refused to allow him to come despite the fact he is an essential and integral part of the Art Department.

Another theory is that’s Ibrahim blocked Abdul coming because Abdul has had arguments in the past with Ibrahim because ATG always pays Abdul late (at one point, nearly six weeks late). So the arguments have always revolve around Ibrahim’s broken promises and Arab Telemedia’s constant failure to pay Abdul’s wages on time.

In an interview today, an ATG employee – Khaldoon – told Abdul that if he became a full-time employee he would no longer have to worry about being paid on time. This was a threat and an acknowledgement of their principle of not paying freelancers properly in an effort to wear them down and make them staff.

Currently Chris is threatening to quit “Medinah” if they do not get Abdul out here. Another reason Chris is threatening to quit is that Arab Telemedia has not paid his wages for the last 4 1/2 weeks. Arab Telemedia cannot claim this is “accidental” because Chris has been reminding them of their failure to pay his wages for the last month. I might also add that the rest of the art department is behind on receiving their wages too.

Before EID (a Arabic festival that took place two weekends ago), Issam was working in the Art Department buildings – a ten minute drive from the production offices as the show’s Line Producer. Line Producers normally wield a lot of power, but it was my observation that ATG had intentionally managed to make Issam powerless by not paying him (at this time, they haven’t paid him for three months!).

Anyway, when Talal got back from Doha, it wasn’t long before things suddenly changed. Issam disappeared. We soon discovered that he was now working in the main offices of Arab Telemedia. But not only had he changed location, his attitude had changed as well. Once a friend to the Art Department, he was now “one of them”. What had suddenly switched Dr Jekyll into Mr Hyde…?

(On an aside, it is ridiculous that the UK crew and ATG see each other as enemies. We try hard not to but they very clearly see us as the enemy and nothing we do to placate them seems t change that. More on this in a later blog entry).

What we heard, which makes sense, was that as a result of Talal’s meeting with the investors in Doha in which – I presume – his lie about the cost of the fortress set was exposed, Issam was to be granted more powers. By the time we relocated to Doha, Issam would be signing for payments as well.

It does not take much imagination to realise what had happened. After Talal was told by the investors that Issam must be granted more power, you would thin that Talal has a problem. But he did not, because at this point Issam was owed around $30-40,000. All Talal had to do was to threaten to not pay Issam and to keep him close by. This is why Issam had suddenly switched sides – he had no choice.

You could argue that Issam is a victim in this situation. And you would be right. The result is that the show has become thoroughly compromised because the Line Producer is supposed to act on behalf of the investors. But Talal has nailed Issam to the wall with the money he is owed. So clearly Issam cannot act on the show’s behalf. How he feels about this, I do not know. 

Today, there was a meeting between the Production and the Art Department to discuss our plan of action over the next 12 weeks. Chris very nearly did not attend.

Last night, he had emailed Issam telling him he was no longer a part of the Medinah team. This was because he had not been paid for the last five weeks, and because Production continued to refuse to bring Abdul over to Qatar. But Chris’s resignation was also a consequence of another ongoing issue.

For the last few weeks we had regularly been emailing Production a “list of things to be done by Production” so that the Art Department could get on with their work. Some of those things were difficult. Others were easy. Others should have been easy. But to date Production has pretty much done none of them.

Last night, Issam sent an email in response to this list in which he accused the Art Department of being hellbent on making life difficult for Production. He then proceeded to go through each point saying why they were effectively each the fault of the Art Department. I shall include that list below so you can decide for yourself. The point of the list was not to make life difficult for Production. It was to see if Production would start to do their job properly again. But the real reason Issam sent that email was to arrest control from the Art Department and to give it back to Production through the meeting we had today. In short, our Art Dept list was to be replaced by today’s Production list that would be cobbled together by Anwar.

Earlier yesterday evening, Chris had a major confrontation with Production and Ahmed over his wages and ATG’s failure to bring Abdul to Qatar. By all accounts, it did not go well. As a result of the meeting and Issam’s email, Chris had had enough and he emailed Issam to say that he had quit.

Despite this, Chris arrived at the meeting having been persuaded to attend by Simon, the director. Ironically Simon later said that Chris should not have attended the meeting because it made his and everybody else’s threats look hollow. (I have been saying this for weeks!) That said, the meeting began somewhat amicably.

Towards the latter part of the afternoon, I brought up the subject of the Construction Manager. Issam had claimed in the previous night’s email, that I had not provided him with contact details for any construction managers (which was not true as I had provided him with them the previous day, the previous Thursday, and the previous Wednesday). I had also told him that we had lost two CMs – Perry and Hugo – and several other construction managers I had approached because of ATP’s refusal to make a commitment. I made the point that we were in a very difficult situation. I told everyone present that we had only one option for a construction manager left.

Ben, an Australian construction manager, had told me that he was available and interested. I had emailed his details to Issam twice the previous week and again yesterday. Issam finally contacted Ben by email and made an offer that threatened to jeopardise Ben’s involvement in the show. Why? Ben had asked if it was a five or six day week. Issam wrote back saying the pay was way below what Ben would expect and that it was also a six-day week. His approach was like a bull in a China shop – almost as if the intention was to alienate Ben.

The entire UK Art Department then preceded to tell Issam that if we were to force the issue of the six-day we would likely lose Ben. Issam was very unhappy about this. He said that his concern was that if he allowed Ben to do a five-day week this would snowball and it would not be long before the entire Art Department wanted a five-day week. We acknowledged that this was a problem. But the point that I stressed was that hiring a CM was a more immediate problem since there were no other options – ATP had exhausted the all.

A good half hour went by while Production, and to a lesser degree Ahmed, argued about how they should agree a five-day week. I kept saying it was because we no longer had a choice. I did not point out that we no longer had a choice because Issam had repeatedly screwed up hiring a construction manager capable of doing the job. (a previous CM had agreed to do it for ATP’s proposed rate but they’d messed him about so much he went and got another job).

Finally, Issam stormed out of the office accusing the Art Department of bullying him and being unreasonable. First Smithers and then I went out to talk to him. We explained that we were not bullying him; rather we were trying to resolve a very serious problem because without a construction manager capable of handling a show of this size there would be no sets, which meant there would be no show.

I had already said in the meeting that if we did not choose Ben and instead decided to see if we could find someone else it would be like playing Russian roulette. Issam refused to believe there could be no other construction managers left. I agreed. I said that was not the problem; the problem was that we had exhausted all of our leads and we had no idea how to find good construction managers who might be available. I said that we might be lucky and find one tomorrow or it could be a week or it could be a month. Our problem, I said, was that we did not have time to find this out because the construction manager was already supposed to be breaking down set plans weeks ago.

Things calmed down. But we were left with a very real problem. And it’s the same problem we’ve had since I got here 4 1/2 months ago and before that when Chris got here and Simon; Arab Telemedia do not listen.

They accuse everybody else of not listening but they fail to listen in the meantime. Issam remarked that we seem hellbent on only using UK crew. We told him that we have every intention of using local crew and training them up but we can only do that if we have the UK crew to train them. Issam said we had made no effort at all to work with local crew. I told him that that was not true and that he knew it because I’d spent the last two months trying to work with Fozan despite Fozan not being a construction manager.

Arguing with ATG employees — and Issam is now one of them — is like arguing with a child. I do wonder if I should read “How To Talk To Children So They’ll Listen”. It really is that bad. If they don’t like what they hear, they don’t hear it. If they don’t like what they see, they don’t see it. They are an impossible company.

In conclusion, we are no more further forward then we were when we were in Jordan. We have lost Abdul, the only person we had who was capable of doing some of the specialised work we need. We have lost Sari who was the only person in Production who seemed to have any idea what he was doing. We have effectively lost Issam who has now become a “tool” (willing or not, I don’t know) of Arab Telemedia.

Meantime, Arab Telemedia is playing the waiting game. Talal told Abdul it was only a matter of time before the shoot went back to Jordan. Two days ago, Ibrahim was overheard saying that this show was never going to get filmed. He may have meant in Qatar. I don’t know.

Ahmed told me yesterday that the budget now is the same as it has always been. This means the budget is still approximately $40 million. I also know that ATG has ordered Issam to do a budget (for filming in Qatar) that is over $100 million. When Ahmed sees that budget he will be furious. This is clearly part of Arab Telemedia’s game-plan. They want a budget that will force the show back to Jordan where Ahmed and the Studio cannot keep an eye on ATG.

The perversity of all this (and I’ve said this before) is that the show could have been shot for $40 million. It just required people who knew what they are doing, and Arab Telemedia clearly not. They haven’t even done something as simple as fix the script locations despite having had months to do it. Today, the production manager, Majid, was out buying shopping bags full of water and biscuits for our meeting. I don’t think I’ve seen a production manager do that since I was a student at film school.

And that pretty much sums this entire production up…

…a show led by a bunch of film students telling a bunch of seasoned professionals how to do the job. There is not a hope in Hell of this show ever getting made so long as Arab Telemedia continues to be attached to it. I suspect they will shoot something eventually, just so they can pretend they were serious about doing so, but they will do it their way and then blame the resultant debacle on the director.

ATG has to go. The question is, when will this happen? And will the show survive it? Or will all the money be gone by then…?


NOTE ADDED May 20th, 2016 (as I forgot to add it at the time of writing the above entry!) – The following email and list was sent to ATG on July 14th, 2015. After which observed ATG do practically nothing on this list within the timeframe specified (they did hire Rita and give Ray a car, but that was practically it). When we continued to update this list showing that ATP was doing next to nothing, they got aggressive and started accusing us of attempting to sabotage the show (while all the time not paying our wages too):-

Email From Chris to Arab Telemedia suggesting way forward

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